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Smilanick Receives Salter Award

Joe SmilanickJanuary 27, 2015 – The California Citrus Quality Council is pleased to announce that Dr. Joseph L. Smilanick was this year’s recipient of the California Citrus Quality Council’s prestigious Albert G. Salter Memorial Award in recognition of his hard work, dedication and vital contributions in the development and implementation of improved technologies to control the postharvest decay of citrus fruit.

The presentation was made during CCQC’s Annual Conference in Visalia by Bob Elliott of Sunkist and CCQC’s Chairman, and Charlene Jewell of the JBT Corporation.  Both praised Smilanick for his 31 year career with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service.  The last 28 years he spent at the ARS station in Parlier until his retirement last year.

Dr. Smilanick’s research efforts focused on the biology and control of postharvest plant pathogens.  His insightful innovations are now common practices in commercial packing houses including integrated thermal treatments of citrus fruit, use of conventional fungicides and biological control agents, ozone applications, fruit washes, and proper disinfestation of de-greening rooms. His research results are recorded in over 250 scientific and technical publications.

His expertise on the fungicide resistance of Penicillium digitatum (green mold)  is known worldwide having collaborated with scientists from Spain to New Zealand.

The California citrus industry appreciates and recognizes his many valuable and practical contributions that have facilitated the movement of high quality fruit through packing houses and into the marketplace.

Salter Award

The Salter Award recognizes an individual for their significant contributions and their dedication and commitment to the citrus industry.

 

CCQC Honors Batkin with Salter Award

Ted receiving Salter Award 101013 The Albert G. Salter Memorial Award was presented to Ted A. Batkin in recognition of his leadership and accomplishments during his 20-year tenure as President of the Citrus Research Board (CRB) from 1993 to 2013. Don Roark, who serves as a director for both CCQC’s and CRB’s Board of Directors, presented the award at CCQC’s annual conference on October 10, 2013 in Visalia. The award is in recognition of outstanding individuals or accomplishments for the betterment of the citrus industry.

Roark highlighted Batkin’s leadership, management and organizational skills. Under Batkin’s guidance, the Citrus Research Board has evolved into an internationally respected gold standard research program that has made significant strides in finding solutions to huanglongbing (HLB) and other devastating citrus diseases, including developing early detection and diagnostic technologies. In response to the introduction of the Asian Citrus Psyllid in California in 2008, Batkin played an instrumental role in creating a pest and disease control program within the CRB and created a state-of-the-art diagnostics laboratory in Riverside. He has embraced new areas of science, new collaborators, and longer term solutions to problems. He has energetically communicated the relevance of the issues and the potential solutions to the grower community.

His dedication, passion for California agriculture and his vision to recognize and help the industry react to threats of invasive pests have earned him the respect and gratitude of the entire California citrus industry.

MCFA ESA Workshop – Presentations

Orman Receives Salter Award

Dick Neece presents award to Chuck Orman

Dick Neece presents award to Chuck Orman

January 25, 2011 – The California Citrus Quality Council is pleased to announce that Charles (Chuck) Orman was honored at CCQC’s annual meeting as this year’s recipient of the prestigious Albert G. Salter Memorial Award. Orman served for 29 years on CCQC’s Board of Directors, 19 years as vice chairman, and filled in as acting president position twice.  During his 30-year career at Sunkist, he worked diligently to improve fruit quality while working with “sound science” to break down trade barriers.

He played a vital role for CCQC in the international arena where he represented the California citrus industry often at international Codex meetings where international pesticide residue standards were being set. He was a member of the Codex Alimentarius Committee on Pesticide Residues (CCPR), the Codex Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants (CCFAC) and often sat in the seat of the International Society of Citrus (ISC) as the citrus industry representative. He also served on various committees for the citrus industry for the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO).

Orman was instrumental in developing fumigation procedures for citrus fruit which led to changes in fumigation practices in Japan and Australia that significantly improved the quality of California citrus in those markets.  He worked with CCQC and the US EPA to preserve the citrus industry’s use of various crop protection chemicals including pre- and post-harvest chemicals such as SOPP and 2,4-D.  During his career he led efforts in pest prevention for medfly, fuller rose beetle, and more recently the Asian citrus psyllid and HLB.

This award is in recognition of his leadership, and his commitment and dedication to the California citrus industry and to CCQC.

The Salter Award recognizes an individual for their significant contributions and their dedication and commitment to the citrus industry.

Luck Receives Salter Award

Robert Luck and Chuck Orman

Chuck Orman presents award to Bob Luck

January 21, 2010 – The California Citrus Quality Council is pleased to announce that Robert F. Luck, a Professor of Entomology at the University of Riverside, is this year’s recipient of the California Citrus Quality Council’s prestigious Albert G. Salter Memorial Award in recognition of his enthusiastic and innovative applied research in the field of citrus entomology.

Over the past several decades, Luck provided laboratory and field research that enabled citrus growers throughout California to effectively incorporate integrated pest management practices into their growing operations, resulting in a reduction in the use of pesticides while maintaining acceptable levels of economic pest control.

Luck is a leading expert in the research of armored and unarmored scale insect control using biological methods. He began his work in entomology through his interest in forestry. At UCR, he has devoted much of his time and research to the study of Aphytis melinus, a parasitoid for the biological control of the citrus red scale.  His contributions to the citrus industry have earned him the gratitude of all California citrus growers.